News

03.09.2014

With AFOSR and DARPA support, Jungwan Cho, Zijian Li, Jaeho Lee, and Elah Bozorg Grayeli have been sorting out the contributions of near-interface defects and electron and phonon coupling to thermal boundary resistance.  
 
Thermal boundary resistance is a long-standing problem in the heat transfer and physics communities, and one of the major remaining challenges is to understand metallic and semi-metallic systems in which both electrons and phonons contribution to conduction. 
 
In these papers, we are using ultrafast optical characterization and patterned bridges down to 50 nm to measure volume and interface resistances in nanolayer samples.  Transport analysis and experimental substraction methodologies are used to isolate the interface resistances, and then additional measurements and modeling serve to separate the electron, phonon and defect scattering contributions.

05.03.2013

Congratulations to both of our undergraduate researchers, Jena Barnes and Maneeshika Madduri, for their prestigious awards and accomplishments over the past few months!

Jena presented a poster "Seebeck Coefficient of Doped Zinc Oxide Nanowire Films" at the 2013 Spring MRS Meeting.  She was accepted into and will be starting a PhD program in materials science at Duke University on fellowship this fall with Prof. Nico Hotz in the Thermodynamics and Sustainable Energy Lab.
Maneeshika received a Fulbright fellowship to build a solar project in Nepal. She was also accepted into the Sandia National Labs Master's Fellowship Program, which provides a fellowship to complete a Master's degree in electrical engineering at Stanford as well as employment through Sandia National Laboratory.
Congratulations to both Jena and Maneeshika for these outstanding accomplishments! 

 

01.28.2013

With AFOSR support, Zijian Li, Jaeho Lee, and Elah Bozorg Grayeli, are sorting out the electron and phonon contributions to thermal boundary resistance.  Thermal boundary resistance is a long-standing problem in the heat transfer community, and one of the major remaining challenges is to understand metallic and semi-metallic systems in which both electrons and phonons contribution to conduction. 

In these papers, Jaeho, Elah, and Zijian are using ultrafast optical characterization and patterned bridges down to 50 nm to measure volume and interface resistances in nanolayer samples.  Transport analysis and experimental substraction methodologies are used to isolate the interface resistances, and then additional measurements serve to separate the electron and phonon contributions.